The Effects of A Traumatic Brain Injury on Your Life

Pettit Law Firm

From lifting a spoon to your mouth to eat to walking into work in the mornings, every simple act you complete each day relies on the use of your brain. Your synapses fire and connections are made to talk, remember, write and read. When something happens that causes a brain injury, there is the potential that you may no longer be able to complete any of those actions. Instead, you become trapped in a body that refuses to react and respond as it should.

Each year, around 1.5 million people suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI), with approximately 85,000 of those people experiencing a long term disability after the fact. Even if the injury itself is mild, the symptoms of the injury can impede daily function and disrupt your life.

Educate yourself on the symptoms and causes of a traumatic brain injury and find out if pursuing legal action is an appropriate choice for your case.

What causes traumatic brain injury?

There is no shortage of ways that one can injure their brain. Simply put, if something strikes your head, there is the chance that your brain can become injured as a result. The latest data from the CDC reports that the top three causes of brain injury are car accidents, being struck by an object and falls. The age groups most likely to experience a TBI are children, young adults and adults over 60.

There are many potential origins of a TBI:

  • Closed head injuries
  • Open head injuries
  • Lack of oxygen
  • Infections
  • Deceleration

One of the biggest challenges of brain injuries is that there is no easy way to prevent one from happening. The best way to avoid a TBI is by abiding by basic rules of safety like wearing a helmet and using your seatbelt, but there’s always the likelihood that something will strike you when you least expect it. Sometimes, even if you do everything in your power to be safe, you can still end up the victim to a traumatic brain injury.

What are the symptoms of a traumatic brain injury?

There are two main types of traumatic brain injuries: mild and severe. Mild TBIs can be tricky to diagnose since they often don’t show up on an MRI or CAT scan. Though the trauma may not be evident, mild TBIs still come with a number of negative side effects:

  • Loss of consciousness for <30 minutes
  • No unconsciousness and instead a dazed, confused state
  • Headache
  • Difficulty thinking
  • Sensory problems (Ringing in your ears, double vision, painful or tingling skin, change in taste and smell)
  • Dizziness

Severe TBIs are harder to miss, with the symptoms being far more extreme. You may experience symptoms like:

  • Loss of consciousness for >30 minutes
  • Limited function of arms/legs
  • Loss of cognitive function
  • Loss of coordination
  • Persistent headache
  • Seizures

Why should I contact a personal injury attorney after a brain injury?

If you have experienced a brain injury, you understand how severe the impact can be on your life. You may have lost the ability to work or function at the same level you once did. If this happens, you shouldn’t feel ashamed by seeking out help. It isn’t your fault that you’ve suffered this injury, and your focus should be on getting better and getting your life back to normal as soon as possible.

By seeking out a personal injury attorney, you can pursue legal action against the person or entity that caused your injury and receive compensation to help pay for medical bills and more. You can receive additional money from punitive damages if the person who caused your accident was acting recklessly, or a pain and suffering payment to make up for additional problems you have experienced. While nothing can undo the trauma of your TBI, a personal injury attorney can remove your worry surrounding finances as you recover.

 

We’re experienced when it comes to fighting on your behalf after a brain injury.

Contact Pettit Law Office today. You deserve a lawyer who cares for your best interests and will work tirelessly to ensure you get the best possible outcome for your case.